tel: 0345 222 0579      email: mail@helpinhearing.co.uk

  • Hearing loss myths debunked

    Hearing loss myths debunked

    Hearing loss can be devastating for anyone that experiences it, as well as their loved ones. However, hearing loss does not have to be as damaging to the quality of life as it once was, thanks to the many technological advancements that have been made. If you or someone you love is suffering from hearing loss, one of the best things you can do is get educated about it. With that in mind, read on to discover more about some of the common hearing loss myths.

    Hearing aids will make everything sound too loud

    Hearing aid technology in the current day and age is truly remarkable, and it is developing all of the time. Many people mistakenly believe that using a hearing aid will simply make noises sound louder, but this is not the case. In fact, this is the reason why people have a tendency to shout at people that have hearing problems. The truth is that volume is rarely the issue. Rather, it is about making sounds clearer so that the person can understand them better. Plus, hearing aids can be controlled based on what you are doing and where you are.

    I only have problems with certain sounds, so I don’t need hearing aid technology

    Can you hear some sounds clearly, yet you have difficulty with other sounds? The good news is that you do not have complete hearing loss, but you are certainly suffering from a hearing issue, which is why it is imperative to seek specialist advice.

    Tinnitus is a disease with no treatment

    Last but not least, tinnitus is not a disease. It is a condition that can happen due to exposure to loud noises and neurological damage. While it cannot be fully cured, treatments and management techniques are available. You need to see a specialist who will determine whether your case is mild, moderate, or severe, and they will then put together a bespoke plan, which can include hearing aids, earwax removal, medication and other techniques.

    Hearing loss myths – where to find out more

    Hopefully, you now have a better understanding regarding some of the most common myths about hearing loss. If you suspect you have hearing problems or you are looking for ways to improve your quality of life, Help In Hearing can assist. Get in touch online or call us on 0345 222 0579 for more information.

    Visit our hearing health section to learn more about hearing and hearing loss.

     

    Photo by Anthony Tran on Unsplash

     

  • What you need to know about ear wax removal

    What you need to know about ear wax removal

    Ear wax is a natural part of ear health. We all have ear wax, it’s just that some people produce more wax than others. Below we explore what you need to know about ear wax removal – what ear wax is comprised of, its protective role, and ear wax removal methods.

    What is ear wax?

    Ear wax is a combination of dead skin cells, secretions and dust. This gradually builds up over time in the ear canal. The consistency and amount will vary between individuals and there is no way of stopping it from producing.

    The role of ear wax

    Although often viewed as a nuisance, ear wax does have an important role to play. It helps to lubricate the ear canal and protects foreign objects from entering the ear canal such as dirt, bacteria and dust.

    Signs that your ears are blocked with wax

    There are a number of signs that can indicate your ears are blocked with wax. These include difficulty hearing, tinnitus, earache, dizziness and recurring ear infections.

    Self-wax removal warning

    It’s important that you don’t insert cotton buds into your ear canal, as this can push the wax further into the ear and cause damage to the ear canal.  

    Ear wax microsuction

    Ear wax microsuction is a procedure which uses gentle suction to remove excessive or troublesome ear wax. It is performed with the aid of a surgical microscope and a calibrated suction device, without the introduction of any materials or liquids. Ear wax microsuction is one of the safest, most effective, quickest and most comfortable methods of removing ear wax. 

    What you need to know about ear wax removal – where to find out more

    Help in Hearing offers hearing health advice via our independent audiologists. Visit our ear wax removal services and microsuction page to learn more.

    Or please do get in touch with us today to book an appointment for ear wax removal.

  • Is ear wax causing hearing loss?

    Is ear wax causing hearing loss?

    There is nothing worse than having to get people to repeat themselves over and over because you are finding it difficult to hear. If you are struggling with your hearing then there may be a number of reasons for this and you should always seek the advice of an independent audiologist. Ear wax can be the cause of hearing loss and if this is the case then this is the most treatable problem that there is. Hearing loss from ear wax occurs because of a build-up of wax in the ear or when it has been compacted against the eardrum. In this article, we discuss “is ear wax causing hearing loss?”

    What is ear wax?

    Ear wax is a mix of skin cells and oil, which combine to trap incoming dust, dirt and bacteria. When your body makes the right amount of earwax you should never have to remove it and never have to put anything in your ear.

    Excess ear wax production

    Excess ear wax may be produced because you are removing it with earbuds or your body may simply produce too much. In this case, you will need to see an independent audiologist to get the ear wax removed safely. The use of cotton buds simply compacts the wax and will make it more likely that you will experience hearing loss.

    When to get a hearing health check

    It can be difficult to know when to get a hearing health check because the loss of hearing can be gradual. If you begin to notice a loss of hearing quality, however, then you should certainly see an independent audiologist to get advice. Ear wax build-ups may also cause the ear canal to become itchy and irritated. If you are regularly tempted to stick a finger in your ear then you should resist this and seek hearing testing to determine whether a build-up of ear wax may be occurring. As a simple rule, if you have any doubt about your ears then you should seek advice. After all, hearing is one of your most important senses and it is extremely important to protect it.

    Ear wax causing hearing loss – where to find out more

    Ear wax can cause the loss of hearing, but this is thankfully the easiest cause to treat. If you’re worried about hearing loss then contact an independent audiologist today. If you would like to learn more about hearing problems and ear wax build-up, then contact us today for more information or to make an appointment.

    You can read about ear wax removal and microsuction, the latest gentle, safe and pain free method for removing ear wax here.

  • Harman Kardon SoundSticks III

    Help in Hearing Online Newsletter – Launch Competition Winner

    In Spring 2018 we launched our new ‘Help in Hearing Online Newsletter’, with sections for:

    • News
    • Events
    • Feedback
    • Advice
    • New Products

    You can view the Spring edition here

    and the winner is…

    Our launch issue included a free to enter competition to win a Harmon-Kardon SoundSticks III, 2.1-channel multimedia sound system and we’re pleased to announce the winner:

    Graham Rogers

    Graham was presented with his prize at our Farnham Common clinic, with an understandably happy smile!

    Graham Rogers winner of Harmon-Kardon help in hearing prize draw

    Congratulation to Graham from all of us here at Help in Hearing.

     

  • When should you get your hearing checked

    When should I get my hearing checked?

    Our hearing is incredibly important, from listening to your favourite song to hearing your loved one’s voice on the phone, it’s part of our lives. But unlike the dentist or the optician, many people don’t think to get their hearing checked until they notice a problem. At Help in Hearing, we believe that your hearing should be looked after as well as any other part of you. So when should you get your hearing checked?

    Age

    As we get older our hearing can start to get poorer but with regular checks and proper attention, it’s important to keep an eye on it. If you’re aged under 45 then a hearing check at least once every two years can be a great start to looking after your hearing proactively. If you’re over 60 then it’s worth having hearing checks more regularly, and our hearing specialists can advise you on how often is best for you to visit based on the results of your hearing check.

    Exposure to noise

    If you’re a professional working in a loud environment then it may be worth getting your hearing checked more regularly to make sure your hearing hasn’t been affected. Working in areas like live music, performance, construction and many others can leave you more at risk of hearing loss. Our expert audiologists can offer you a full consultation and understand the risks to hearing you have encountered. They may be able to suggest measures to protect your hearing in the future and will do a full hearing test to get a picture of how your hearing has been affected.

    You’re noticing hearing loss

    It’s always better to look after your hearing proactively but if you’ve been noticing issues with your hearing then it’s best to see an audiologist as soon as possible. If you’ve been having the television or the radio turned up so you can hear it and others think it’s loud, that might be a sign of hearing loss. If you sometimes miss words in conversations or you struggle hearing on the telephone, then this is another sign that you should get your hearing checked.

    When should you get your hearing checked?

    At Help in Hearing, we are dedicated to providing the very best hearing advice for you. If you think it’s time for you to have a hearing check-up, contact us to book now.

    Find out what to expect if you come to us for a hearing assessment.

  • What are cochlear implants?

    What are cochlear implants?

    About cochlear implants

    Cochlear implants can provide viable hearing alternatives to anybody who doesn’t benefit from typical hearing aids. They consist of a receiver which is implanted in the mastoid bone, behind the ear and electrodes which are implanted into the cochlea (inner ear). The microphone and speech processor are located externally and they convert sounds into electrical impulses which are transmitted to the electrodes implanted in the inner ear. The electrodes use the auditory nerve to communicate these signals to the brain, which perceives the impulses as sound.

    Who uses cochlear implants?

    Around 7,500 people in the UK are considered audiologically suitable for a cochlear implant and there are currently around 11,000 people already utilising cochlear implants. Children or adults with severe or profound deafness could well benefit from cochlear implants. Additionally, cochlear implants can make a real difference to anybody who struggles with the use of traditional hearing aids. Bone conducting hearing implants are another form of implanted hearing treatment, which can benefit anyone with conductive or mixed hearing loss. Around 10,000 people in the UK currently use bone conducting hearing implants.

    About bone conducting hearing implants

    A bone conducting hearing implant is suitable for people with single-sided deafness and will transmit sound to the good ear. People with conductive hearing loss experience a problem with sound travelling freely to the cochlea, which could be caused by abnormalities in the structure of the ear or blockages, due to excess ear wax or middle ear fluids. A mixed hearing loss is a result of the loss of hair cells within the cochlea or the hearing nerve.

    Bone conducting hearing implants work via direct bone conduction and are independent of the ear and the ear canal. They consist of a small titanium screw which is implanted into the skull to provide an anchor for the sound processor and an abutment which is attached to the screw and provides a base for the sound processor. The sound processor acts in a way that’s similar to the middle ear and converts sound waves into vibrations which can be passed to the inner ears.

    Cochlear implants – where to get more information

    We are pleased to have been appointed as a reseller of the Advanced Bionics (AB) range of cochlear implant accessories and components, including AquaCase – the world’s first waterproof case for cochlear implant recipients. These accessories set the standard in quality and innovation, while allowing recipients to customise their AB sound processors to fit their needs—all weather, all sports, all terrain, all ages and all lifestyles. Please get in touch if you’d like to talk to us about cochlear implant accessories.

    You can read about the accessories we provide in our Cochlear Implant Accessories section.

  • How to look after your hearing

    How to look after your hearing

    As with our sight, hearing is one of the things that we take for granted until it begins to deteriorate. For many, hearing loss is an inevitable development in life, but it is never too late to start looking after your hearing. Whether you already use hearing aids or simply want to protect your hearing, the following steps will tell you how to look after your hearing and keep it in the best possible shape throughout your life.

    Regular hearing testing

    Regular hearing tests are important for every individual. Identifying a problem early will make it easier to treat and will give you the best chance of protecting your hearing from damage. Like eyesight tests, hearing tests should be performed regularly and by a trusted professional. Use an independent audiologist who will be able to assess your hearing development over a number of years and keep your ears in tip-top condition.

    Music volume

    Listening to loud music and films is one of the most common causes of hearing damage. If you are a regular user of headphones, you should ensure that you keep them turned down to a reasonable level. Install a volume control app on your phone and this will prevent you from doing damage to the eardrums.

    Noise at work

    If you are exposed to noise at work, it’s very important that you wear the correct protective equipment. Workplace noise will very frequently exceed recommended levels. If you think that this is the case, talk to your employer about protective equipment. Employers are legally obliged to provide this if noise levels are too high.

    Hearing aids

    If your hearing does start to deteriorate, you should consider your long-term hearing health and seek advice on whether to use a hearing aid. Struggling on with poor hearing will mean that you are constantly increasing the volume of things around you and the result of this will be increased damage. A hearing aid, however, can help to regulate the volume and expose you to the correct level of sound for a comfortable life.

    How to look after your hearing – where to find out more

    At Help in Hearing we At Help in Hearing we will be able to educate and advise you on how to best take care of this most precious of senses – your hearing. We are a local independent, family run hearing healthcare practice. Our commitment to provide outstanding service related to hearing health is unfaltering. We love what we do and with a combined 50 years’ experience, we are proud to offer our clients unrivalled standards of professional hearing health care. Please get in touch to talk to us about how to look after your hearing.

    We explain noise and hearing protection on our Hearing Health web section, please visit to find out more about how to protect your hearing.

     

  • How to treat tinnitus

    Tinnitus and how to treat it

    At Help in Hearing, we provide superior consultancy, advice, and support to enable our clients to get on top of any hearing issues they’re experiencing, and we find that lots of the people that come to us do so because they’re affected by one condition in particular: tinnitus.  

    Causing individuals to hear certain sounds that come from inside their body rather than outside, tinnitus often manifests itself as a sort of ringing noise in the ears, although it is also reported as a buzzing, whistling, hissing, grinding, and humming sensation. It can even be heard as noises similar to music and singing.

    This can be very annoying for those affected by tinnitus, especially because the condition can also be accompanied by a slight deterioration in your hearing, or an increased sensitivity to everyday sounds.

    If any of this sounds familiar, you might want to keep on reading to find out what causes tinnitus and and how to treat tinnitus…

    Tinnitus severity

    If you’re concerned that you may be experiencing tinnitus, rest assured that you needn’t worry too much. Rarely a sign of anything serious, it is usually irritating, but not detrimental to your health.

    However, more severe cases can have a greater impact on the everyday lives of people who experience tinnitus, with some claiming to find it distressing, and feeling that it impacts their concentration, causes difficulty sleeping, and even depression.

    Although the condition will usually resolve itself gradually, this is why some choose to seek medical help to treat the problem and ensure a quicker resolution.

    Causes of tinnitus

    If you feel you might be affected, you’re probably wondering what causes tinnitus. There are a number of possible catalysts, including but not limited to:

    • Age-related hearing loss
    • Repeated exposure to loud noises
    • A build-up of earwax
    • A middle ear infection
    • Otosclerosis (an inherited condition causing abnormal bone growth inside the ear)

    However, do note that around one-third of cases have no obvious cause.

    How to treat tinnitus

    If you believe that you’re experiencing tinnitus and would like to seek treatment for the condition, there’s plenty that can be done for it. Although no single method works for everyone, there are lots of possibilities to try.

    If there is an underlying cause, resolving this is one place to start. This means that should you have earwax, for example, it may be as simple as having this removed. If the catalyst is less specific, one of the following might be suggested:

    • Hearing aids: Many people find that wearing hearing aids to correct their hearing also reduces or completely gets rid of their tinnitus.
    • Sound therapy: This is where the tinnitus affected person listens to neutral sounds in order to distract from the symptoms of tinnitus. An example of this is the Widex ZEN2GO, which emits random, soothing harmonic tones to help you relax and manage your tinnitus.
    • Counselling: Where tinnitus is affecting your quality of life, you may also be encouraged to try counselling, in order to learn how best to cope with the condition.
    • Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT): Therapy can also be useful for some individuals, helping them to focus less on the noise they hear so its impact is reduced.
    • Tinnitus retraining therapy (TRT): Similar to the above, TRT can be used to retrain the way your brain responds to tinnitus, teaching it to tune out the sounds so you’re less affected by them.

    Tinnitus Support Group

    If you live in the Marlow and Farnham Common, Buckinghamshire areas, you may wish to attend our next Tinnitus Support Group event, which is on Wednesday February 7th at our Marlow hearing clinic. Or see dates for future events on our Tinnitus Support Group page. Please contact us on 0345 222 0579 to book your place.

    How to treat tinnitus – where to find out more

    Find out more about tinnitus on our page, Tinnitus Explained.

    Find out some ways we can help you manage tinnitus.

  • Holistic hearing care

    Why a holistic approach to hearing care is best

    There is no doubt that our hearing is one of the most important senses we have and looking after it is absolutely key. Taking a holistic approach to our hearing health is not only vital, but extremely sensible also. It can help prevent hearing loss and flag up any dangers well in advance so they can be dealt with in good time. Here we discuss why a holistic hearing approach is best.

    What is a holistic hearing approach?

    A holistic stance on hearing health is one that involves incorporating it into our daily lives and making it something we keep a keen check on, even if nothing is wrong. Think of it in a similar way to visiting the dentist for our oral health. We all make sure we do that at least twice a year, even if we think our teeth are totally fine. It is just something we all do as we know that prevention is better than cure, so doing this keeps us as healthy as possible.

    The holistic approach to hearing works in the same way – it just means doing everything you can before any issues arise to prevent hearing loss, and keeping your ears in great shape by visiting an audiologist.

    How to implement a holistic hearing approach

    In the same way that you regularly visit a dentist, frequent visits to an audiologist are a fabulous idea. This will allow any issues such as earwax build-up to be discovered or give you the chance to discuss any issues you have noticed such as tinnitus. By doing this, you will nip any problems in the bud before they develop and keep your ears in the best of health for longer.

    Holistic hearing care – where to find out more

    If you are looking for a professional and experienced audiologist in the Buckinghamshire area, then contact us today. With 15 years in the business, we offer a friendly service that puts the customer at the very heart of what we do. Our continuity of service means you will see the same audiologist every time you visit for that added personal touch. Call or email us today and let us help you stay on top of your hearing health.

    Find out more about hearing health and hearing changes here.

  • Hearing Aids Recycling Scheme with The Lions Club

    Hearing aids recycling scheme

    We regularly recycle used hearing aids by donating them to the Lions Club for their hearing aid recycling scheme. This allows the Lions Club to provide affordable hearing aids for hard-of-hearing individuals who have limited financial resources.

    The Lions ClubThe World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that 278 million people around the world have moderate to profound hearing loss in both ears. But less than 10% of those people will ever get hearing aids because annual production doesn’t go anywhere near meeting the demand. The poor are especially affected because they are unable to afford the preventative care necessary to avoid hearing loss, or hearing aids to improve their hearing.

    Hearing impairment and deafness are serious disabilities that can impose heavy social and economic burdens on individuals, families, communities and countries.

    Children with hearing impairment often experience delayed development of speech and language skills, which may result in slow learning and difficulty in school. Adults who are hard of hearing ofen experience difficulty in obtaining and keeping employment. Both children and adults may suffer from social isolation as a result of hearing impairment.

    Hearing aid recycling – how the scheme works

    Hearing aids recycling bin for the Lions ClubLions collect hearing aids and send them to regional Lions Hearing Aid Recycling Centers. The centres utilise donated hearing aids in various ways:

    • Lions may partner with participating hearing care professionals who refurbish donated hearing aids to fit the individual needs of the recipient.
    • Lions may provide a team of hearing care professionals or volunteers with a supply of donated hearing aids that have been repaired and refurbished for use during a health care mission to a developing nation.
    • Lions may give donated hearing aids to participating manufacturers who issue credit to the Lions for all useful parts. This credit value is then applied towards the purchase of new hearing aids for persons who have limited ability to pay.

    Lions clubs and Lions hearing foundations collect thousands of hearing aids each year.

    Lions Hearing Aid Recycling Centers utilise donated hearing aids in various ways as a means to provide hearing aids for those in need.

    Lions operate voluntarily with the support of public donations, individual member contributions, and Lions Clubs International Foundation grants.

    100% of public donations to Lions clubs is used for charitable causes – no money goes towards administrative expenses.

    Hearing aid recycling – where to find out more

    Next time you’re at one of our hearing clinics we’d be happy to tell you more about our hearing aid recycling scheme. You can also find out more information at the Lions Club website or you can get in touch via our contact form.