tel: 0345 222 0579      email: mail@helpinhearing.co.uk

  • Blackwater Valley Runners

    Santa Fun Run – Wendy’s blog update

    Just a little over 2 weeks now until the Santa Fun Run on 24th November for Alzheimers Dementia Support.

    One of the Alzheimer’s Society’s top tips for reducing the risk of developing dementia is to stay socially active by joining a club, so with this in mind I have joined my local running club The Blackwater Valley Runners.

    Running with a group helps me to run longer distances and build some stamina and the company helps the miles go by more enjoyably.

    The club meets at 7pm and we set off into the cold evening for what I thought would be a gentle 4 mile run. There were 15 other runners in my group and I was able to have a chat with most of them during the run – except when we were running uphill when I needed to save my breath!

    6.5 miles later, I arrived back at the club house, having run further than I was expecting but very pleased that I had kept up with the group.

    Guess the time competition

    To support ADS and have the chance to win a £50 John Lewis voucher, please visit our Just Giving page.  Donate £1 and include your name and the time, in minutes and seconds, that you think it will take me to complete the 5K Santa Fun Run.

  • Training for the Santa Fun Run on the North Downs Way

    Santa Fun Run – Wendy’s update 28th October

    With 4 weeks to go before the Santa Dash at Dorney Lake for Alzheimers Dementia Support (ADS), I decided that my training on Saturday would be a long walk rather than a run. I set off from Farnham (Surrey) Station to walk along the North Downs Way national trail to Guildford, covering ten miles. The walk is mostly on woodland paths and is far enough from the road to be unpolluted by noises from traffic.

    The path initially runs alongside farmland and I wished a cheery “good morning” to some sheep and cows before passing through a field of corn.

    There is no definite way to prevent dementia and research continues to investigate how the disease develops. However, there is good evidence that leading a healthy lifestyle can reduce your risk of developing dementia (source: NHS Website).

    My walk not only provided good exercise but was an opportunity to exercise my senses; looking for seasonal changes, listening to bird song and learning about the local nature reserve from information boards.

    To support ADS and have the chance to win a £50 John Lewis voucher, please visit our Just Giving page.  Donate £1 and include your name and the time, in minutes and seconds, that you think it will take me to complete the 5K Santa Dash.

  • Wendy & Jan run the Alzheimers Dementia Support Santa Fun Run on 24th November

    Santa Fun Run – Wendy & Jan are dashing through the snow

    Dashing Through the Snow…..

    …..Guess my time to complete the 5K Santa Dash and win a £50 John Lewis Voucher

    Well I’m hoping there won’t be snow but on 24th November I will be donning my Santa Suit and taking part in the annual Santa Fun Run in support of Alzheimers Dementia Support (ADS) and the work they do for the local area. Follow this link to learn more about the service and support Alzhemimers Dementia Support provide. 

    The Santa Fun Run is a 5K fun run around Dorney Lake and I will be joined by Jan Gosling, our secretary at Help in Hearing, and a small group of friends.

    I would like to invite you to support ADS by taking part in a competition to guess the time it will take me to complete the 5K circuit.

    Entries for the competition cost £1, with all proceeds being passed to ADS. To enter, either make a £1 donation on my Just Giving Page, adding your name and how long you think I will take in minutes and seconds or call into the office on 0345 222 0579 and we will record your guess at reception.

    Over the next few weeks I will be keeping you up to date with my training schedule for the Santa Fun Run and will be providing a few clues as to my expected finish time.

    Wendy x

  • Who lets the dogs in?

    A survey in August 2013 by the charity Hearing Dogs for Deaf People revealed that over 80% of deaf people with hearing dogs have been refused access at some point in businesses or shops. This article discusses the Who Lets The Dogs In campaign.

    We fully support the charity’s new campaign – called “Who Lets the Dogs In?” –  to raise awareness among businesses of their obligation, under the Equality Act 2010, to allow disabled people with hearing dogs into their premises.

    Feedback showed that business owners have wrongly refused access to deaf people with hearing dogs due to ‘hygiene reasons’ or a concern that the dog may cause a disruption. However, the Chartered Institute of Environmental Health states that risk of an assistance dog posing a hygiene risk or behaving badly in any public space is very minimal.

    Michele Jennings, Chief Executive of Hearing Dogs for Deaf People said:

    “Hundreds of deaf people in the UK rely on their hearing dog to help them every day, and it’s upsetting and degrading when they are turned away from a business.

    “Not only do hearing dogs carry out a wide range of practical tasks, but they also provide a deaf person with the support and confidence needed to live an independent life.

    “The Equality Act 2010 states that service providers must not treat people with disabilities less favourably if they have an assistance dog, so we want to ensure that all businesses are aware of this.”

    Hearing dogs complete a rigorous 18 month training programme, in which they are trained to toilet on command, lie quietly on the floor in a restaurant or café, and taught not to wander freely around the premises.

    You can pledge your support for this campaign or get information for businesses and assistance dog users on the Hearing Dogs website: hearingdogs.org.uk/access

  • How are Lyric hearing aids fitted?

    National Campaign for Regular Hearing Tests

    We are championing a national campaign calling for regular hearing tests to be provided alongside dental and eye tests. This campaign is instigated by Audira, a think tank shaping the future of hearing care and challenges the medical norm of “reactive hearing care”, ie waiting for a problem to occur before addressing it. The campaign lobbies for a preventative approach of regular tests and care. Read the “4 Questions to ask about hearing” leaflet, developed in support of the campaign.

    Hearing tests - national campaign

    Help in Hearing is an early adopter of this approach and promotes the “Eyes Checked, Teeth Checked, Hearing Checked” campaign. We provide hearing tests in support of the Audira promotion.

    Hearing tests – as important as regular eye and dental checks

    It’s only in the last few years that it’s become generally accepted in the UK that hearing care is as important as looking after our eyes and teeth. We all grow up knowing that our eyesight and teeth will last longer if checked regularly and that our quality of life improves dramatically if we look after them. We need to take the same preventative measures for our hearing.

    People wait 4 years before visiting an audiologist

    In a recent research study by RDSi, 360 hearing aid users were surveyed and it was found that people experiencing hearing difficulties waited on average 4 years before they visited an audiologist, causing further damage to their hearing. The wait is accredited to 2 main reasons outlined in additional research from Action on Hearing:

    • Stigma related with wearing hearing aids which stops people admitting they have a hearing problem
    • A lack of understanding that prompt action will alleviate hearing issues

    When someone wears glasses, it’s socially acceptable. Wearing braces for teeth correction is socially acceptable. But wearing a hearing aid carries a stigma that makes it feel unacceptable. Today totally invisible hearing aids can help people with hearing problems avoid this negative social perception. We have to combat this in the UK and we can only achieve that by making hearing tests a standard check-up along with eye and teeth check-ups.

    Read the Action on Hearing (formerly RNID) report here.

    Request a hearing test with us online