• Ear wax management during the Coronavirus lockdown

    Why we need full PPE to perform wax removal

    Why we need full PPE to perform wax removal

    Any form of wax removal is an aerosol generating procedure, meaning that tiny particles of moisture are airborne. Because the Coronavirus is transmitted through the air and is highly contagious, we would have to wear the full PPE, including gown, gloves, filtered mask and visor to protect ourselves and our clients. 

    What is an aerosol generating procedure (AGP)? Aerosols are produced when an air current moves across the surface of a film of liquid; the greater the force of the air, the smaller the particles that are produced. Aerosol generating procedures (AGPs) are defined as any medical and patient care procedure that results in the production of airborne particles (aerosols).

    PPE requirement guide for aerosol generating procedures

    This illustration from Public Health England explains the requirements if performing AGP procedures. 

    PPE for aerosol generating procedures

    Ear wax management

    If you’d like to make an appointment about ear wax removal, please get in touch with us by email, fill in our online contact form, or call us on 0345 222 0579

     

     

  • Starkey Livio AI - the healthable hearing aid

    Healthable hearing aid features of the Starkey Livio AI

    Do you have the Starkey AI hearing aids?

    For anyone who already owns the Starkey Livio AI hearing aids, we wanted to remind you about the useful technology that is built into these hearing aids, making them “healthable hearing aids.”

    The Livio AI is a world-first hearing aid that has artificial intelligence which can track brain and body health. Until now there has never been a device that can track and measure physical activity and cognitive health. Most fitness tracking devices use the wrist but research shows that the ear provides far more accurate data. In fact, the ear is the body’s sweet spot for reliable health monitoring and tracking, this is all available in your hearing aids, devices you wear every day.

    Compatible with both Android and Apple smartphones, Livio AI provides a body score, brain score and an overall score, combining the two, using an app called Thrive. The Livio AI is truly a “healthable hearing aid“. 

    What is a healthable hearing aid?

    A healthable hearing aid uses artificial intelligence (AI) and embedded sensors to produce superior sound quality and smart health & wellness benefits too.

    Watch this Starkey video to find out more:

     

    How to use the Livio AI extra features

    If you’d like to learn more about how to use some of your Livio AI’s features, please get in touch by email, fill in our online contact form, or call us on 0345 222 0579, we’d be happy to help.

    Some of the features of the Livio AI hearing aid are:

    • Tracking your steps, body movement & physical activity
    • Measuring social engagement & active listening
    • Fall detection
    • Foreign language translation
    • Connection to Siri
    • Create geo-tagged memories

    Step and movement tracking

     

    Healthable hearing technology can do things like track your daily steps and activity levels, motivating you to move more, which can help keep you healthier as you age. Experts agree that the head — and the ear, specifically — is a much more accurate place to measure our physical activity and monitor our body’s “signals” than on the wrist or in a pocket. By including 3D motion sensors like an accelerometer and gyroscope, Livio AI hearing aids are able to detect movement and gestures and give a more reliable readout of your steps and activity. 

    Livio AI hearing aids make it easy to stay on top of both your body and brain health. Paired with the Starkey Thrive Hearing app, Livio AI hearing aids track your physical activity (similar to a FitBit) and measure actions that are good for your brain health, like daily usage of your hearing aids, social engagement, and time spent listening actively. Each day, the Thrive app then combines your body and brain activity to give you a Thrive Wellness Score, which helps you know if you’re meeting your physical and cognitive health goals.

    Fall detection and alerts

    If you’re an older adult — or care for someone who is — falling is likely to be high on your list of worries. And rightfully so, according to Age UK:

    • According to data released by NHS Digital, nearly 100,000 older people (aged 60+) suffered hip fractures in 2017/18
    • Falls are the most common cause of injury related deaths in people over the age of 75 with over 5,000 older people dying as a result of a fall in 2017, a 70% increase on the numbers in 2010, according to Age UK.

    How fall detection and alerts work

    • The hearing aid wearer selects up to three contacts to be notified if they fall.
    • They (or their hearing professional) can enter contacts easily into the Thrive Hearing app.
    • The auto alert feature automatically sends an alert to the contact(s) if the hearing aid wearer falls.
    • The alert contains the GPS location of the wearer.
    • The contact can then immediately call the wearer back to check on them or otherwise get them help.
    • The manual alert feature allows the wearer to simply tap their hearing aid to send an alert for a fall or non-fall related event.

    Translation tool

    The Livio AI hearing aid translates languages as you hear them – 27 languages are catered for.

    How the translation tool works

    • Select your language and that of the other speaker to engage in a conversation.*
    • When you speak into your iPhone®, the Thrive Hearing app will translate your speech and display it on the screen in the other person’s language. Show them the screen so they can see what you’re saying.
    • When the other person speaks into your phone, the app will translate their speech, display it in your language on the phone, and also stream the translated text to your hearing aids in your language.

    *Choose from these 27 languages: Arabic, Chinese, Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Finnish, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Hindi, Hungarian, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Norwegian Bokmal, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Slovak, Spanish, Swedish, Thai, Turkish

    Self-check

    Self Check provides a quick, convenient way for you to analyse your hearing aid system’s performance. Your hearing professional sets the feature and establishes a baseline at the initial fitting.

    Self Check is an app-based feature that provides you with a quick and convenient way to find out how your hearing aid system is performing. To get started, your hearing professional sets this feature during the initial fitting and establishes a baseline. Then, at any time, you can run a diagnostic test, using the Thrive™ Hearing Control app.

    After you initiate the test, a diagnostic analysis runs on the main components of your hearing aids – the receiver, microphone, sensor and circuit. If an issue is uncovered, instructions on how to fix it will appear on your smartphone screen. At this point you may wish to make an appointment with your hearing professional depending on what the specific issue is.

    What do users think of the Livio AI?

    Healthable hearing aid – where to find out more

    If you’d like to find out more about how to use these features of your Livio AI hearing aids, please get in touch with us by email, fill in our online contact form, or call us on 0345 222 0579, we’d be happy to help. 

    In summary, the question isn’t “What is hearable health technology?” The question is: “Why didn’t anyone think of this before?”

    Coronavirus update

    During the Coronavirus lockdown, although we are unable to see patients face to face, we are available by phone and video call and are also operating a drop-off and collect as well as a postal service for any servicing you require for your hearing aids. Please read our Covid-19 update page for more details of how this operates.

     

  • Drop-in hearing health event at Marlow Business Festival

    Drop-in hearing health event

    ==== 11 March: STOP PRESS: PLEASE NOTE THE MARLOW BUSINESS FESTIVAL HAS BEEN POSTPONED TO LATER IN 2020 ====

    Drop-in hearing health event – please join us at Marlow Business Festival

    Friday March 27th 2020
    12:00pm – 2:30pm
    At Help in Hearing, Cedar House, Glade Road, Marlow SL7 1DQ (free parking on site, opposite Glade End Guest House)
    Refreshments provided
    To book your place: events@helpinhearing.co.uk

    Marlow is to welcome its first business festival, 26th – 29th March, to “shape the future” of the high street. Organised by the Marlow Chamber of Commerce, the inaugural event aims to improve the relationship between businesses and the community.

    On Friday March 27th, Wendy will be joining Kevin in our Marlow practice to run a drop-in clinic from 12:00-2:30pm, offering new clients complimentary hearing screening, with an ear health check.

    Discount voucher

    Please do let your friends and family in Marlow know about the event. If the hearing screening or otoscope demonstrates a need for a follow-up appointment, we will offer a £40 off voucher for a full hearing consultation and £20 off microsuction wax removal.

    To book

    Do call if you would like to book an appointment or find out more: 0345 222 0579. Or please get in touch using our online contact form.

    You can find out more about the festival on the Marlow Chamber of Commerce website.

  • Health management and our coronavirus policy

    Health management

    In the last week, we have been contacted by a few clients who have travelled abroad and returned with heavy colds and have cancelled their appointments, so as not to spread germs. It is worth remembering that hearing tests can be affected by a cold, so it is best to reschedule your appointment until you are feeling 100%.

    Please don’t be offended if we suggest an appointment is re-scheduled if you arrive and are unwell. We are just looking after your health, our other clients and our staff.

    We have a strict hygiene protocol at Help in Hearing. We wash our hands before, during and after every appointment. We wear protective gloves for all ear care appointments and have a well-stocked supply of antibacterial wipes and hand sanitisers. We keep our equipment scrupulously clean, using single use equipment wherever possible.

    We have young and elderly clients who are more prone to picking up infections so please do let us know if you are unwell. It is our policy to inform clients if our audiologists have heavy colds at any time, so that they have the option of postponing an appointment.

    Coronavirus

    Please see below information on Coronavirus and our approach to the situation. In summary, we ask that visitors and staff who have recently returned from high-risk areas (see below) follow government guidance and, if in any doubt or if you have any concern or symptoms, do not to visit us for at least 14 days from return to the UK.

    At Help in Hearing we are monitoring the UK government’s information and advice on Coronavirus. Up-to-date information can be found here on the government coronavirus website.  This information is updated regularly and any clients or staff who are concerned are encouraged to check this site for the most current information.

    Returning travellers

    In summary, the advice about returning travellers is that anyone who has travelled to the UK from mainland China, Thailand, Japan, Republic of Korea, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore, Malaysia or Macau in the last 14 days and is experiencing coughing, fever or shortness of breath, should stay indoors and call NHS 111, even if symptoms are mild.

    Anyone who has returned from the following areas since 19 February, should call NHS 111, stay indoors and avoid contact with other people even if they do not have symptoms:

    • Iran
    • Specific lockdown areas in northern Italy as designated by the Government of Italy including in Lombardy: Codogno, Castiglione d’Adda, Casalpusterlengo, Fombio, Maleo, Somaglia, Bertonico, Terranova dei Passerini, Castelgerundo and San Fiorano; and in Veneto: Vo’ Euganeo
    • ‘Special care zones’ in South Korea as designated by the Government of the Republic of South Korea including Daegu and Cheongdo
    • Hubei province (returned in the past 14 days)

    Anyone who has returned from the following areas since 19 February and develops symptoms, however mild, should stay indoors at home, avoid contact with other people immediately and call NHS 111. They do not need to follow this advice if they have no symptoms.

    • Northern Italy (anywhere north of Pisa, Florence and Rimini)
    • Vietnam
    • Cambodia
    • Laos
    • Myanmar

    All our staff and anyone who has visited our practice are asked to advise us if they are diagnosed as having contracted Coronavirus, or have been in proximity to someone who has been diagnosed with Coronavirus in the last 14 days.

    Information about the virus itself and how to prevent it spreading can be found on the NHS website.  In line with this advice, we ask visitors and staff to ensure they are regularly washing their hands with soap and water, to cover their mouths when coughing or sneezing, and to dispose of any tissues when used.

    If you’re unsure about any aspect of health management regarding your appointment with us, please get in touch via our online contact form, or call us on 0345 222 0579.

  • Protecting your hearing when you are young

    Protecting your hearing when you’re young

    Imagine having a ringing in your head…….all the time. Imagine not being able to hear music properly, or conversations with friends. This kind of damage to hearing is 100% preventable, but once it happens, it’s irreversible. Protecting your hearing when you are young has never been more critical. In an age where you are always surrounded by noise: hearing conservation is more crucial than ever. Loud music, earphone usage, industrial work, concerts, motorsports and shooting can all contribute to hearing loss as you get older. Unfortunately, many young people do not appreciate the dangers of hearing loss or take precautions to prevent premature loss of hearing.

    World Health Organisation research

    The World Health Organisation (WHO) has found that 1.1bn teenagers and young people are at risk of hearing loss. Nearly 50% are exposed to unsafe levels of sound from the use of personal audio devices and around 40% are exposed to potentially damaging levels of sound at entertainment venues. WHO research also found that 43 million people aged between 12 and 35 already suffer from hearing loss.

    Dangers to hearing

    Exposure to loud sounds for prolonged periods of time can irreparably damage hearing and lead to chronic hearing issues such as tinnitus (ringing in the ears). One of the leading causes of hearing loss and hearing issues is related to workplace noise. Although there have been many developments in workplace laws over the last 50 years, there are still many workplaces which do not provide adequate hearing protection to employees. Working in a factory with loud machinery or working as a guitarist in a band can both be equally detrimental to your hearing if you have not got the right level of ear protection.

    Listening to music

    Young people are particularly susceptible to hearing damage as a result of listening to music. Prolonged exposure to music, even if it is not turned up to maximum volume, can be detrimental to your hearing health. Still, young people listening to music via headphones, earphones and air pods are particularly at risk. Studies have shown that regular use of earphones to listen to music can diminish hearing thresholds and can lead to noise-induced hearing impairments.

    Musicians

    Jono Heale, Director at ACS Custom, gave a talk last year to students at the Royal Northern College of Music, about hearing protection and safe listening. Watch the video to see Jono’s talk.

     

    Research on professional and amateur musicians shows that they can also suffer. George Odam, Emeritus Professor at Bath Spa University and Fellow of the Guildhall School of Music and Drama undertook a research project into the health of music students. After a 1-year pilot study, he found that 26% had tinnitus and 17% had some degree of hearing loss. Other research shows that musicians and DJs are 3.5 times more likely to suffer from music-induced hearing loss and almost 1.5 times more likely to develop tinnitus than the general population.

    Even today, hearing conservation and occupational health, safety and welfare for musicians is not mandatory as a subject in music education. Typical decibel levels for different types of music would be: Chamber ensemble, playing mezzoforte, 80-85dB; Symphony orchestra, 94-120dB; Pipe and drums band, 100-110dB outdoors, 116dB indoors; Amplified rock band, 94-120dB and Front of house mixing desk, 97+dB. Considering your maximum time exposure at a level of 85dB is 8 hours, and for every increase of 3dB, that exposure time halves, this means that at 100dB, 15 minutes is the maximum safe exposure time.

    If you’re listening to or playing in any of those scenarios, you will likely be exceeding that exposure time and thus increasing your risk of music induced hearing loss.

    How is your hearing damaged?

    Maybe you’ve just come out of a bar or a live music venue and your hearing has gone a bit muffled. Usually this is temporary and your hearing will go back to normal after a little while. But if it doesn’t, it could be noise or music induced permanent hearing loss. Or you get a ringing noise in your ear, which again disappears after a short while. If it doesn’t go away, it’s a warning that you could be at high risk of hearing damage.

    What can you do to safeguard your hearing?

    If you frequently attend live music events, have loud hobbies (such as motorsports) or work in an environment which is subject to loud noise – then adequate hearing protection is necessary to ensure optimum ear health. Even if you have never experienced hearing problems, exposure to loud noise for prolonged periods could have a delayed effect, which will be experienced many years from now. Wearing ear protection such as earmuffs, plugs and canal caps are the best ways of ensuring that your ears remain healthy for years to come. It’s important to choose earphones that completely block out the background noise, otherwise you’ll find you need to turn the music up by around 10dB in order to hear the music above the background noise.

    Foam earplugs

    These are just an auditory block, in that they literally block the ears. They affect the clarity of sound and so are no good for listening to music.

    Custom-made ear protection

    ACS earplugs

    ACS Custom offers off-the-shelf and custom made earplugs which are popular with those working in the music industry. Custom made earplugs can be made for you if you are frequently exposed to noise for prolonged periods. We take an impression of your ear and then scan this with a laser, create a 3d model and then 3d print a mould, into which we inject the soft silicone. The benefit of a custom made earplug is

    • they stop you getting hot and sweaty, as air is allowed to pass through the ear plug in both directions
    • they don’t block the sound
    • there is less occlusion (the sound your own voice makes inside your head when you’re wearing normal earplugs)
    • there is a better frequency response
    • music without the muffle
    • better overall communication, as you can hear conversation at the same time as reducing the level of the background music or noise.

    Custom in-ear monitors (CIEM)

    ACS also make in-ear monitors for vocalists for on-stage monitoring. These are also made from soft silicone, unlike many other manufacturers’ CIEMs, which are made from hard acrylic, thus not being as flexible or as good a fit as the soft silicone CIEMs.

    At Help in Hearing we can advise on the most appropriate hearing protection from custom made solutions, in the ear monitors, electronic noise suppressors for those that shoot or a non-customised product such as ER20’s, should you need something urgent for a one off event. We also supply customised swim moulds. Our ear impressions are sent off to ACS who offer a choice of custom-made soft silicone earplugs, popular with musicians, DJs, vocalists, sound engineers and frequent visitors to gigs and clubs. These high-fidelity bespoke fitting earplugs cost around £140. Earplugs protect against hearing loss by using advanced noise-reduction technology. Earplugs can be used by anyone to reduce the impact of loud noises, whether you are playing at a gig or standing in the crowd! If you value your hearing and you like loud music you should really play safe now so you can still hear tomorrow. 

    Universal fit earplugs available

    We also sell high fidelity, attenuating earplugs from ACS Custom. These are generic, off-the-shelf, universal fit earplugs which have an attenuating filter. This means that they can filter out a certain number of decibels. We can provide these from our practice, and they retail at £10, which we recommend for anyone who knows they will be exposed to loud music or noise. It is worth considering always having a pair with you – they come with an easy to store keyring – as noise exposure is everywhere. For example, cinemas are often overly loud – you may remember the feature in our last newsletter about actor Hugh Grant walking out of the film Joker.

    Have you had a hearing test?

    Regular hearing tests may seem like overkill if you haven’t already got hearing problems. However, they can be essential for catching any potential issues before they become full-blown problems. Getting an occasional hearing test will help identify any hearing concerns so that precautions can be taken to avoid the problem from getting worse. Of course, a healthy lifestyle will also help keep your hearing in good condition – especially as exercise helps to improve blood flow to your ears!

    What should you be doing?

    • Be aware of sound levels and your exposure times, especially in social situations.
    • Co-operate: turn down amplified equipment if asked to and if necessary.
    • Wear hearing protection that you are given or buy. Make sure you wear it all the time in noisy areas.
    • Look after your hearing protection.
    • Report any problems: don’t keep quiet about your concerns about noise, loud music or your hearing. See your GP or an audiologist if you’re concerned, get yourself tested and get it checked out. You only have one pair of ears.

    Protecting your hearing – where to find out more

    For more information on hearing protection solutions please fill in our online contact form or call us on 0345 222 0579.

     

    With thanks to Jono Heale from ACS Custom

  • Hearing loss and cognitive decline - is there a link?

    Can hearing loss lead to cognitive decline?

    Did you know that leaving hearing loss untreated can increase the risk of dementia? That’s according to several recent studies. In this article, we look at the key details in this research into hearing loss and dementia and explain why it is so important to have hearing loss tested and treated.

    The link between ageing, hearing loss and dementia

    In April last year (2019), the Ear Foundation, an independent charity based in Nottingham which supports people of all ages with hearing loss, unearthed some of the most compelling findings related to the link between hearing loss and dementia. It concluded that ageing had led to growing numbers of people with hearing loss and cognitive decline. It was found that some 60 per cent of adults who have dementia also experience hearing impairment. They also discovered that more than 90 per cent of adults with dementia who live in “aged care” also have a hearing impairment.

    The Ear Foundation highlighted that hearing loss has been linked to impaired communication and in turn, social isolation and loneliness, which can be health threatening. Their report underlined the importance of health systems to invest in tackling hearing loss, in order to help people maintain the “social connectedness” which can be so vital to brain health.

    A key factor

    While there does appear to be an undoubted link between hearing loss and cognitive decline, as a report in the Practical Neurology online journal pointed out: “It has not been proven that cognitive impairment (including dementia) is caused by hearing loss or that cognitive impairment causes hearing decline.”

    The publication highlighted several shared underlying mechanisms behind hearing loss and cognitive decline, which are; overdiagnosis, widespread neural degeneration, sensory degradation or deprivation, cognitive resource allocation and depletion, and social isolation and depression.

    Is hearing loss a crucial clue?

    Hearing aids could cut the risk of dementia

    Another thorough body of work was a study conducted by Brigham and Women’s Hospital in the United States. Its research – conducted over a ten-year period – also supports the theory that hearing loss is associated with a larger risk of cognitive decline. The investigators suggested that “hearing loss may help identify individuals at greater risk of cognitive decline and might provide insights for earlier intervention and prevention,” making it clear that regular tests with an audiologist and the timely provision of hearing aids could be a way of cutting the risk of dementia.

    The value of a hearing aid

    In July 2019 the Times reported a study which concluded that wearing a hearing aid later in life could protect you against dementia, as well as slow brain ageing. The research found that people who wore hearing aids, primarily to address hearing issues, also saw their cognitive functions more effectively maintained. The impact measured was amazing – this study found that those who wore hearing aids had brains which performed eight years younger on average

    The raft of various studies has found that, at best, there is a huge potential for a link between hearing loss and cognitive decline. Now the onus is on health systems, as well as the public, to ensure that timely hearing tests are carried out as a matter of course.

    Hearing loss and cognitive decline – where to find out more

    The experts seem to agree that treating hearing loss provides protection against gradual cognitive decline. If you are beginning to find it difficult to hear in certain situations, don’t allow it to get worse, book an appointment for a hearing test and consultation with one of our audiologists. We provide comprehensive testing using state-of-the-art technology, personalised treatment and ongoing support.

    Read our article “What to expect at a hearing assessment” to find out what’s involved.

    Or please fill in our online contact form to book a hearing assessment.

  • Valentine's Day Special Offer

    Show someone with hearing loss that you love them this Valentine’s Day

    Is someone you love experiencing hearing loss?

    Across the UK, one in six adults are affected by hearing loss, so many of us will know someone who is noticing some changes in their hearing.

    In most cases, hearing loss occurs slowly. We are not immediately aware of it but gradually we notice that we need to ask friends and family to repeat conversations, or we are told that the television is far too loud for others’ comfort.

    Asking friends to repeat themselves?

    As our hearing difficulties become more noticeable, we may start to feel uncomfortable in social situations because we need to keep asking our friends to repeat themselves. We stop going to meetings and avoid those social situations that may be difficult due to our hearing.

    The result? We are not living life to the full!

    Hearing loss can be managed with the latest hearing aids and accessories. The first step is to book for a hearing test and consultation.

    “Love your ears” promotion

    To celebrate Valentine’s Day, we are holding a “Love Your Ears” promotion for a free hearing test and consultation with Wendy on February 14th. To book, call us on 0345 222 0579 or fill in our online contact form.

    This Valentine’s Day, show your friends and family that you care by saying those three special little words: “Help in Hearing.

  • Diabetes and hearing loss - what's the connection?

    The connection between diabetes and hearing loss

    What is the connection between diabetes and hearing loss? Research has emerged in recent years which proves that hearing loss is more common in adults with diabetes. It has been found that if you have diabetes, you might be two times more likely to have hearing loss.

    Why is diabetes linked to hearing loss?

    The precise reason why diabetes can be considered a risk factor for hearing loss is not yet known. There is a school of thought which believes that diabetes could damage the hearing nerves – a type of diabetic neuropathy which can also occur in the legs and feet. There is a second theory that the high blood sugars present in diabetics could cause damage to the small blood vessels which support the inner part of the ear. When these vessels are damaged, hearing can be compromised.

    Research by the NIH

    Research into diabetes and hearing loss

    One of the most important studies on diabetes and hearing loss was conducted by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) in 2008. They found one of the strongest links yet between diabetes and hearing loss. They analysed hearing test results from across the US and found that those with diabetes were more likely to have at least minor hearing loss compared to people who do not have the condition.

    Maternally inherited

    Another important piece of research showed that hearing loss can in fact be maternally inherited by some of those with diabetes. Some one per cent of those with diabetes have a subtype of the condition called Maternally Inherited Diabetes and Deafness (MIDD), which typically causes sensorineural hearing loss. MIDD usually develops in diabetes patients before the age of 40.

    I’m a diabetic. How can I prevent hearing loss?

    As a diabetic, you should note that the better you can control your blood sugar, the less likely it is that high blood sugar can cause hearing loss. That makes sticking to diet treatment plans and medication important for heating protection.

    Which steps do I need to take?

    Control blood sugar to help prevent hearing loss

    You might not have noticed a deterioration in your hearing, but if you have diabetes, it is recommended that you take a hearing test, if you haven’t already. These tests should be taken periodically – aim for once a year. It is important to monitor your hearing at regular intervals as a diabetic because it can deteriorate over a short space of time. Getting periodical tests makes it easier for you to get the treatment you need, when you need it, should you discover that your hearing is getting worse.

    When should you see a doctor?

    If you have already begun to experience hearing loss, it is important that you get it checked out as soon as you can. Your doctor may refer you to an audiologist, a health care professional who is a specialist in diagnosing and treating hearing loss. The sooner you address hearing loss, the sooner you can be advised and supplied with devices such as a hearing aid, which can allow you to maintain your quality of life.

    Diabetes and hearing loss – where to find out more

    If you think you might be affected by diabetes and hearing loss, please contact us to book an appointment. We recommend a half an hour appointment, which will include a hearing test plus the opportunity to discuss diabetic hearing screening with one of our audiologists. Our fee for this will be £50. Call our freephone number to book: 0345 2220579, email us or fill in our online contact form and we will get back to you to make the appointment.

  • Caring for your hearing aids

    Caring for your hearing aids

    Caring for your hearing aidsWe are always happy to clean and service your hearing aids. They are very precious to you, so remember to book in to see us regularly to ensure they are in tip top condition and working their best for you. Here are some tips on caring for your hearing aids.

    Between appointments there are some very useful tips you can follow. If you would like us to set you up with a cleaning kit set, we can discuss what you will need and tailor your requirements accordingly. We might need to order certain items in for you and can outline the costs at your visit.

    For example, to care for your RITE hearing aids effectively you will need:

    • Antibacterial wipes
    • A small brush (may have a small metal loop on the other end)
    • A wire filament
    • A hook or pick
    • A drying box if necessary (please ask us about the different types that may be suitable for you)

    Hearing aid cleaning kitThe British Society of Hearing Aid Audiologists (BSHAA) have produced a very good series of leaflets to help you care for your aids so we have put a PDF link to these guides below. If you would like to be sent a copy of any of these leaflets please do let us know.

    To read or download the leaflets, click on the leaflet name below. A new browser tab will open and the leaflet will appear on the screen. You can then either read it on screen, download it to your hard drive, or print it out.

    Behind-the-ear (BTE) hearing aids

    BTE hearing aids with open fitting

    In-the-ear (ITE) hearing aids

    RIC and RITE hearing aids

  • Santa Fun Run group shot

    Santa Fun Run – We did it!

    We did it! Jan, 5 of our friends and I completed the 5K Santa Fun Run around Dorney Lake last Sunday. We arrived at 10.30 am and pulled on our Santa suits. The day started out quite cold and foggy so we were grateful for the extra layer and the white fluffy beard.

    At 11.30 we moved into the starting lane with all the other Santas for the warm up which consisted of a short dance routine and lots of shouts of “Ho, Ho, Ho” and then we were off!

    Our friends Michael and Andy went off very quickly and finished ahead of us in around 22 minutes. There was a great atmosphere as we jogged around the mostly flat course. On the lake itself, teams of rowers dressed as reindeer raced alongside us. We passed some members of the public out for a nice Sunday morning stroll and some looked quite bemused as 200 or so Santas puffed passed them.

    The Santa Fun Run in aid of ADSThe weather started to improve and the sun came out. About half way around the lake I was getting quite warm so did take off the beard and the Santa hat! Once around the top of the lake we started to head back towards the finish line, which involved running over 3 short bridges before turning the final corner to the home straight.

    With a final surge, I sped towards the finishing line and crossed it just as the clock ticked to…………

    I was very pleased with my time but you will have to wait until 13th December before we reveal it.

    We have already raised over £350 for Alzheimers Dementia Support (ADS) – thank you to everyone who made a donation.

    There’s still time to enter our competition

    There is still time to enter our competition to guess the time it took me to complete the 5K Santa Dash. The closest time will receive a £50 John Lewis voucher. To enter call Jan or Gilly on 0345 222 0579, drop into the office or go to our Just Giving page and provide your name and your guess in minutes and seconds. Guesses cost £1 and all proceeds will go to Alzheimers Dementia Support

    Wendy x